A Spring in My Step

Connecticut Tulips

Tulips from just outside our front door.

There’s something special about spring in New England. After any particularly harsh winter, the ground is dry, hard, and still cold, well into March. Around the first of April, the first sign of spring arrives. Robins appear, brown grass starts to turn green, and the buds start to show if you look close to the trees.

I’m the first to admit that I am not a cold weather runner. I hate getting out of bed to strap on a headlamp, gloves, tights, and a jacket to run a few miles, especially when my gym is less than 4 miles away. But when spring starts to pop, it’s time to get outdoors! One challenge remains with the light and, on several occasions, the cold early morning temps. The Wednesday after the Boston Marathon bombing, it would have taken an act of God to keep me inside. I ran that day four miles. One mile for each Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell, and Lu Lingzi, then another mile for everyone else injured. Little did I know at the time, that there would be another victim, Sean Collier of the MIT Police Department. I left my music at home, really thinking about the victims and how they were there to support their friends and family. While several runners were severely injured, the supporting family members were hit hardest. And as Forrest Gump says, and that’s all I have to say about that.

Yesterday, I knew that I needed a long run. The weather was in the upper 50s when I left, and I didn’t really know how far I was going to run. Leaving without a plan is not really in my nature, but wanted to run as long as I felt good. After starting on my street, I considered heading into the park, but didn’t really want to run with so many people. Instead, I took the big loop around the adjoining neighborhood, then turned right and headed down a long straight away for a couple of miles. At a stop sign, just after crossing out of my town, I turned right. This loop is one I’ve taken in the past, but not a favorite at this point because I can see the hills ahead of me and know that the hills will kick my butt.

The fourth mile is my current least favorite. While it seems to be a daunting hill, there is really only 130 feet of elevation but it nets a 25% grade over the distance. While I was running using a 3/1 run/walk ratio, my time pretty much goes in the crapper for this section. I did run up a good portion of the hills, slowly, but also walked a bit further than planned so I could finish the run. At this point, I was in my middle mile, so know there’s quite a distance ahead of me. I have a longer loop that I took during my half marathon training that ends up at the same point, but the road to get to this elevation was a long, less dramatic hill.

All in all, I was very pleased with my six miles. The 5th mile was actually my fastest and still included a long hill, and my 6th mile was my second fastest. I’m not quite sure what that tells me except that it takes me a while to get going, and my plan for starting slow actually works! I did cut my mileage back in April but will crank it up in May. I plan on many more outdoor runs and far less treadmill time as the morning light starts earlier every day! My workday starts earlier now, so if I can get out the door at 5, I’ll get in my run and still make the daily 8:45 meetings.